MingPositionChinese Martial Arts Etiquette

     Etiquette and courtesy are a fundamental component of Chinese Wushu/Kungfu training and discipline. Traditional Chinese Martial Arts Etiquette is earnestly emphasized at all Wing Cheun KungFu Kwoons. The etiquette of traditional Chinese Martial Arts is based on the ancient Confucian household and is rich with traditions of mutual respect, courtesy, and decorum. In our Kwoon, traditions are liberally seasoned with humor.

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Style Guide for KungFu

     Before we begin talking about the history of Shaolin KungFu, we should note what the term KungFu means in China. You see, despite popular opinion, it's really a term that refers to any individual accomplishment or refined skill that is achieved after hard work. So for example, if you really work hard to drop a sparring partner with a spinning back kick, that's KungFu.

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Cheung, History of Wing Chun

     The origin of Wing Chun Kung Fu can be found in the turbulent, repressive Ching (Manchurian) dynasty of over 250 years ago. It was a time when 90% of the Chinese race, the Hans, were ruled by the 10 minority, the Manchurians. The Manchurians treated the Hans unjustly.

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Traditional Wing Chun Linage

     According to William Cheung (Cheung Cheuk Hing), the person responsible for the divergence between traditional and modified Wing Chun was Leung Jan who lived two generations before Yip Man. Leung Jan taught Wing Chun to his two sons and also his neighbour Chan Wah Shun.

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Yip Man, History of Wing Chun

      The founder of the Wing Chun System, Miss Yim Wing Chun was a native of Canton China. As a young girl, she was intelligent and athletic, upstanding and manly. She was betrothed to Leung Bok Chau, a salt merchant of Fukien. Soon after that, her mother died. Her father, Yim Yee, was wrongfully accused of a crime, and nearly went to jail.

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Guide to ChinNa

     ChinNa or Qinna (Cantonese Yale: kàhm nàh) is a Chinese term describing joint lock techniques used in the Chinese martial arts to control or lock an opponent's joints or muscles/tendons so he cannot move, thus neutralizing the opponent's fighting ability. ChinNa su (Chinese: 術; pinyin: shù meaning technique) literally translates as technique of catching and locking in Chinese.

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A Brief History of Shaolin

      It is said that a Buddhist monk from India named Buddhabhadra, or Ba Tuo in Chinese, came to China during Emperor Xiaowen's reign during the Nothern Wei Dynasty period in 495AD. The emperor liked Buddhabhadra and offered to support him in teaching Buddhism at court. Buddhabhadra declined and was given land to build a temple on Mt. Song. There he built Shaolin, which translates into small forest.

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Guide to Nei Kung

     Nei Kung, also spelled NeiQong, NeiGung, or nae gong, refers to any of a set of Chinese breathing, meditation and spiritual practice disciplines associated with Taoism and especially the Chinese martial arts. Nei Kung practice is normally associated with the so-called "soft style", "internal" or neijia 內家 Chinese martial arts.

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